Exactly How Good a @MASNCommenter #Nats Team Would Be #MLB15THESHOW

SOON.

MORSE!!!

UPDATE: I’ve determined I should be able to broadcast a computer simulated game featuring the MASNCommenter Nats vs. The Mets in an “Opening Day” Tilt. I will post the link here and on twitter. Should be a 1:05 start.

I am new to the world of Playstation, but I got one around Thanksgiving and I do enjoy it. As a baseball and video game fan, I’ve been anxiously waiting for MLB The Show to debut its 2015 edition, which did indeed “drop” on Tuesday. I’ve never played this game before and, frankly, I’m terrible at it.

Like with most baseball games you can play whole seasons at a time, or even set yourself up as the GM of a franchise and build your team from the ground up. I was iffy on whether I wanted to start that particular campaign last night, but a thought occurred to me:

There is a whole cottage industry of video game simulations being used to demonstrate theoretical concepts in sports. Breaking Madden being king amongst them. Routinely, as a blogger and a baseball fan, folks ask me “well, what about…” or “what if…”.

Some ideas are crazier than others, and there is perhaps no greater repository of don’t-know-it-all Nats thoughts than those archived by @MASNCommenter. We profiled MC last year, who faithfully copies the comments section of fans on the MASN Facebook page, generally the crazy/insane/overly emotional/poorly spelled ones. James O’Hara wrote a piece theorizing what a Nats team might be like if we made many of the trades proposed in tweets.

So here I am: Holding back the real bullpen and bench preview posts until the dust settles a bit more, a week away from baseball starting, I have this video game I am terrible at…why not turn to the experts for help?

So, yes. I created the 2015 season for the Washington Nationals in MLB the Show 15. I then proceeded to put together the most MASNCommenter 25-man roster I could. My plan is to then simulate the whole season (I won’t be playing the games, just telling the computer to play itself) and see how the Nats do.

Mike Taylor in CF. Nice, young, up and comer.

What Kind of Roster Does MASNCommenter Like? 

When I solicited help from twitter, I got one answer over and over. MASNCommenter would clone 25 Steve Lombardozzis and field them all. Sadly, the game won’t let me do that.

Continue reading

Friday Roundup: Late Sunday #Nats Edition

Thank you for accepting my delayed round up. In appreciation of that, here is a Bryce Harper Home Run.

#NatsClubHouseSocial: Tuesday night, the Washington Nationals social media team invited a handful of highly visible, highly social, highly interactive Nationals fans for a presentation regarding the new bells, whistles, and giveaways at the park this year. It was preceded by a free happy hour with appetizers, and personalized jerseys custom made for the invited fans featuring their surname, the #15 (for 2015) and the exclusive 10 year DC patch.

If you don’t know already, I was one of those lucky, unworthy, happy people. I instantly felt nervous about my Matt Williams post from that morning, but too late to go back! (Also, no one asked me to write anything about this event or anything else, just so you know.)

Continue reading

Podcast! 2015 Nats Season Preview with @NoahFrankWTOP

EDIT: I fixed the audio so it is properly mixed.

Noah Frank joins our show to talk about where the Nats are right now and how they look for 2015. On the show: the 25 man roster, the rash of injuries suffered by the team, how good is the Nationals rotation, is this bullpen sustainable, Strasburg, Harper, a little Matt Williams, an NL East preview, a rest of the MLB preview, and plenty more. Enjoy!

Spring Training Question #2: Can Matt Williams Grow As A Manager?

Matt Williams managing the NLDS.

Look, I get it. Managing is tough. When the team wins, most folks usually congratulate the players and when they lose, most folks usually blame the manager- and that’s usually the fair thing to do. Players can streak or slump, but managers always have the ability to move those players around accordingly. Imagine if for every decision you made at work there were 40,000 people in your office silently (and not so silently) deciding how they would have done your job better. Worse are the hundreds of thousands more at home doing the same thing, and by tomorrow every hack with a Macbook is going to write up how they you screwed up even if the team did win and why you should be fired.*

(*I am one of those hacks).

I say this so that you know that when I do pick at Matt Williams managing in this post, I am fully aware that this is the easy thing to do. That I would not be a good manager myself, that I know I don’t know better than he does, and that I am fully aware that my opinion here does not reflect the opinion of the majority, or maybe even plurality, of other Nats fans. But these are things I am compelled to write because I believe them to be true. So, here we go…

Continue reading

Friday Round Up: #DCisReady

The 1895 Washington Senators 43-85 in the National League. via Cool Old Photos (Click for link) but H/T to @GhostsofDC

The 1895 Washington Senators 43-85 in the National League. via Cool Old Photos (Click for link) but H/T to @GhostsofDC

The Walking Dread: With any luck, this tweet from Chelsea Janes bodes well for the Nationals walking wounded:

-or, lightly running, as the case may be. But too bad, I wrote all of this out before I saw this tweet, so I’m going to continue with my “how ugly could this get?” post.
The worst news first: Anthony Rendon went from sitting out for a few days to having no timetable. That’s really scary.  CL strains (of any kind) can get ugly quick, even if they are mild. As HarperGordeck from Natsbaseball blog points out, the prospect of Kevin Frandsen at third for a month, or longer, is laughably scary.

Continue reading

Spring Training Question 3: Old (and New) Faces in New Places?

Nationals Logo

The Nationals will feature four position players not playing the position they primarily played last year.  In his Monday chat, T. Boswell (oh Lord save me I am linking to a BOZ CHAT) remarked that the Nats shaky 2014 defense (which is a suspect sentiment given he’s employing fielding percentage, and Fangraphs ranked the Nats 7th overall) would now feature Bryce Harper, Jayson Werth, Ryan Zimmerman and the newly added Yunel Escobar all playing different positions on the field.

If I put aside the general grating against my brain every time I read something Boz writes, he’s right that this is a pretty big question. How will these guys fare in their different spots? We’ve touched on this already in our outfielder post (positing that Harper ought to flourish in right, while Werth may be able to handle left a bit better than he handled right). Shortstops tend to do well at second, and I’m not sure anyone has assumed anything other than Ryan Zimmerman can do a passable job at 1B, where his throwing (typically considered his weak spot) ought not come into play nearly at all.

Now with this post: I could postulate, what-if, speculate or pretend I can give you some direct, informative answer on how these guys will do in their new position. Or, I could fear-cast, telling you this will all end poorly based on nothing . I don’t want to do either of those things mostly because neither really answers the question. Frankly, nothing short of spring training and, ultimately, the 2015 season will tell us how they will fare.

Even though we can’t know what will happen, we can take a look at the reasons behind some of these moves. When faced with a question without a certain answer, we can only do the best we can with the information we have. So, instead, (in 101 style) let’s ask why these moves are being made at all, and look at some evidence for why.

Continue reading

Get To Know A Nat 2014: Matt Thornton

407819

 

Name: Matthew J. Thornton (not to be confused with this Matthew Thornton who signed the Declaration of Independence)
Nickname(s): Matt
DOB: September 15, 1976
Twitter?:  None
From: Three Rivers, Michigan
Position:  Reliever
Hand: Lefty

With the Nats Since: August 5, 2014 when the Nationals selected him off waivers from the New York Yankees 

Just Who Is This Guy?: Thornton is a former all-star reliever (2010 All-Star) who has been in the league, mainly the American League, for the last 11 seasons. He’s pitched a total of 655 games, logging a 32-45 record with a 3.48 ERA. Thornton spent the majority of his playing career with the Chicago White Sox but has also played for the Seattle Mariners, Boston Red Sox and New York Yankees.

During the 2004 season, Thornton made his major league debut at the age of 27 with the Mariners. He threw four innings of scoreless ball, struck out one and gave up three hits and walked one batter. He finished the 2004 season with a 1-2 record and a 4.13 ERA in 32.2 innings.

Thornton was traded to the Chicago White Sox on March 20, 2006 and performed during his tenure with the White Sox. From 2006-2012, he logged 435.1 innings, going 31-32 with a 3.25 ERA, 2.91 FIP and struck out 465 batters. During his All-Star season, Thornton threw 60.2 innings, generating a 5-4 record with a 2.67 ERA, 2.41 FIP and 81 strikeouts. He also had eight saves that season.

According to Brooks Baseball, Thornton heavily uses his fourseam fastball that tops out around 96 mph. He also throws a sinker (96 mph) a lot, and tends to throw a 90 mph change and an 84 mph curveball.

What Happened in 2013: On July 12, 2013, Thornton changed the color, being traded from the White Sox to the Red Sox. In 40 games with the White Sox before the trade, he posted a 3.86 ERA in 28 innings. He struck out 21 and issued 10 walks. With the Red Sox, he appeared in 20 games and struck out nine in 15.1 innings.

While the Red Sox won the 2013 World Series, Thornton injured his oblique in August and never fully recovered before the season was over and was left off the postseason rosters.

On November 2, 2013, the Red Sox granted Thornton his release, allowing him to sign with any team. 

What’s happening in 2014 so far?: On January 10, 2014, the Yankees penned Thornton to a two-year, $7 million deal to help bolster their bullpen. However, the Yankees decided that with the emergence of other, cheaper bullpen arms such as Dellin Betances and Adam Warren, mixed with his expensive contract, Thornton was expendable.

Thornton was actually putting together a solid season for the Yankees before the waiver claim, posting a 2.55 ERA in 46 games. He had 20 strikeouts and six walks in 24.2 innings. With the Nationals, he has appeared in three games as of August 13, 2014 and pitched 2.2 innings with a 0.00 ERA and a strikeout.

The addition of Thornton makes one of the best bullpens in baseball even more dominant. He can get batters out on both sides of the plate – right-handed batters have a .255 average against him while lefties have a .254 average against him. Thornton’s experience and veteran leadership will be valuable to the Nationals down the stretch and allow them to give some of their oft-used bullpen arms a much needed break to gear up for the postseason.